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The Extraordinary Real Photography of Arno Rafael Minkkinen

The Extraordinary Real Photography of  Arno Rafael Minkkinen (1)The Extraordinary Real Photography of  Arno Rafael Minkkinen (2)Many of my photographs are difficult to make. Some can even be dangerous. I do not want to have someone else coming in harm’s way taking the risks I need to take: to lean out off a cliff or stay underwater for the sake of my picture. We control how much pain we can tolerate; such information is unknowable by anyone else.The Extraordinary Real Photography of  Arno Rafael Minkkinen (4)The Extraordinary Real Photography of  Arno Rafael Minkkinen (5)The Extraordinary Real Photography of  Arno Rafael Minkkinen (6)Many of my photographs are difficult to make. Some can even be dangerous. I do not want to have someone else coming in harm’s way taking the risks I need to take: to lean out off a cliff or stay underwater for the sake of my picture. We control how much pain we can tolerate; such information is unknowable by anyone else.The Extraordinary Real Photography of  Arno Rafael Minkkinen (8)The Extraordinary Real Photography of  Arno Rafael Minkkinen (9)The Extraordinary Real Photography of  Arno Rafael Minkkinen

The Extraordinary Real Photography of  Arno Rafael Minkkinen

Many of my photographs are difficult to make. Some can even be dangerous. I do not want to have someone else coming in harm’s way taking the risks I need to take: to lean out off a cliff or stay underwater for the sake of my picture. We control how much pain we can tolerate; such information is unknowable by anyone else. Some of my pictures might look simple, but in reality they can test the limits of what a human body is capable of or willing to risk. Thus I title them self-portraits, so the viewer knows who is in the picture and who took it.  This means no manipulation of any kind, no double exposures or overlapping negatives. Fortunately I began decades before Photoshop was invented. What you see happening in the frame of my image happened inside the viewfinder of my camera. It’s a line I wrote as a copywriter in an advertising agency in New York working on a camera account: What Happens Inside Your Mind, Can Happen Inside A Camera. I believed in the concept strongly enough that I wanted to become a photographer myself.

As you leave the viewfinder, trust the camera to finish the job. I do not use an assistant to look through the camera; otherwise she or he also becomes the photographer. Instead, I have nine seconds to get into the scene, or if I am using a long cable release bulb, I can press it and throw it out of the picture, knowing nine seconds later the camera will fire.

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